Mediterranean Cruise: Part 4

From Venice to Barcelona: Part 4
Naples, Italy
Pompeii, Italy
Amalfi Coast, Italy
Driving through Naples on our way to Pompeii, we had a spectacular view of Mount Vesuvius, most famous for it’s eruption in 79 AD that destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii and several other settlements. It killed an estimated 16,000 people, and is currently the only active volcano on the mainland of Europe. 
As we walked through the vast ruins of Pompeii, I became more and more aware of how close we truly were to the active volcano. Just a little frightening. It is considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world because of the large population living at the base (3,000,000) and its tendency to erupt.

After we left Pompeii, we took a winding bus ride to the Amalfi Coast, on the southern shore of the Sorrento Peninsula. Words cannot describe the beauty of this cozy Italian coastline. As we zigzagged down to the water, the view became more and more spectacular. The drive was half of the fun and took some patience, as it took about an hour or so from the top to the bottom, twisting and turning. 

Once down to the water, we took a relaxing boat ride to enjoy the coast from a different vantage point. I couldn’t help but envy those who had summer homes here, relaxing on a boat of their own. It just looked like a golden paradise.

The Amalfi Coast is famous for cultivating lemons and producing the after-dinner liqueur, Limoncello.  Along the coastline, they are able to harvest this local treat three times a year. Due to the volcanic soil and warm temperatures, the lemons are unusually sweet. 

Also pictured is the Saint Andrew’s Fountain in Piazza del Duomo outside the Amalfi Cathedral. 

—-ALL photographs, designs, and text, are licensed by Cundiff Creative Photography and Graphic Design and are not to be used for commercial use or modified. License permits others to copy and distribute my work provided you give Cundiff Creative full credit and follow the above specifications.

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